Pet Cremation

Displaying 31 - 40 of 84123456789

What is the average cost of a pet cremation?

The cost of a pet cremation varies, but the average cost runs from $50 to $150, depending on factors such as the size of the pet, the weight, whether you choose individual or group cremation, and your location.

Since there is very little regulation in the pet cremation industry, what should I be doing to make sure that my pet’s remains will being treated with respect and dignity?

You need to act as your own advocate when looking for a pet cremation provider. Be proactive in doing your research and asking the right questions. You want to be sure you are working with a reputable company that will meet your expectations and carry out your wishes.

To learn more about choosing a pet cremation provider, click here for a free downloadable copy of our guide “Saying Good-bye: Your Guide to Choosing Pet Cremation Services” <<>>

Is the pet cremation industry as regulated as the human cremation industry?

Currently the states do not require the same degree of oversight with pet crematories that they do with human crematories. Consequently, when looking for a pet cremation provider, you need to be proactive in doing your research. Ask questions to make sure you are working with a reputable company that will meet your expectations and carry out your wishes.

Does the state regulate pet crematories?

Currently the states do not require the same degree of oversight with pet crematories that they do with human crematories. Consequently, when looking for a pet cremation provider, you need to be proactive in doing your research. Ask questions to make sure you are working with a reputable company that will meet your expectations and carry out your wishes.

Are all pet crematories the same?

Although they all provide the same basic service – pet cremation – the quality and cost of the services can vary from one facility to another. It is important to understand that pet cremation is a developing industry. There is currently little oversight in this industry, so you need to be your own advocate. Be proactive in doing your research and asking the right questions. You want to be sure you are working with a reputable company that will meet your expectations and carry out your wishes.

What are some creative ways I can memorialize my pet?

If you cremate your pet, some options may include:

  • Scatter the ashes in a place that was special to you and your pet
  • Aerial scattering from a plane
  • Scattering into the sea
  • Incorporate the ashes into a piece of memorial jewelry
  • Place the ashes in a biodegradable urn and bury them with a seedling that will be nourished by the ashes
    Have a synthetic diamond made from the pet’s fur

If you bury your pet, some options may include:

• Personalized grave stones
• Planting a shrub or tree in honor of the pet
• Photographic etched headstones

If either option is chosen, you could:
• Create a memorial service and have family members attend
• Make a donation in honor of your pet to a local animal shelter

Can I have a funeral for my pet?

Your pet brought love, enjoyment, and companionship into your life. There is no reason you should not have a funeral or other type of memorial service for your pet, if that is what you want. Many owners choose to create a special ritual or service that is unique and personally significant. Certain funeral homes and pet cremation facilities may also offer assistance with use of their facilities and services when planning an observance for your pet.

Can I bury my pet’s ashes?

Yes. Some owners choose to bury their pet’s ashes, either in a pet cemetery or on private property. Check first to make sure there are no local zoning regulations or other laws against burying animals in the area.

Can I bury my pet in my back yard?

Yes. If you are the property owner, and there are no local zoning regulations or other laws against burying animals in the area under question

What if I’ve buried a pet, and then move, but don’t want to leave their remains behind?

Before you move, you may want to consider exhuming (digging up) the remains of your pet and have them cremated. This option allows you to store the ashes in an urn that can be taken with you when you move.

You should be aware that because the pet was first buried and not directly cremated, there will likely be some amount of soil that cannot be removed, and will be mixed in with the ashes.

Displaying 31 - 40 of 84123456789

Ask a Question

Use the form below to ask a question

Fill in your email address