Pet Cremation

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Can large animals like horses be cremated?

Yes. You will need to find a pet crematory with a cremation chamber that is large enough to accommodate the whole body of an oversized animal.

Do I have to purchase an urn or a casket if I have my pet cremated?

No. You are not required to buy an urn or a casket. If you elect not to purchase a permanent container such as an urn, you will receive the cremated remains back in some type of temporary container.

How do I choose a pet crematory?

Because the pet cremation industry is not strictly regulated, you need to be your own advocate. Be proactive in doing your research and asking the right questions. You want to be sure you are
working with a reputable company that will meet your expectations and carry out your wishes.

• You may search a pet cremation provider in your area by <<>>>
• Ask your veterinarian for recommendations
• Check online reviews of the business
• Check with your local Better Business Bureau
• Ask specific questions about the services the business provides (see our free downloadable guide “Saying Good-bye: Your Guide to Choosing Pet Cremation Services” <<>>

Can my veterinarian help me with the process of having my pet cremated?

Yes. Your veterinarian will be able to discuss your cremation options and explain what is involved, as well as the fees for various services. Many veterinarians work in partnership with cremation service providers and can handle the arrangements for pickup of the body and delivery of the ashes back to you after cremation takes place.

What are some reasons that pet cremation is increasing in popularity?

Today’s society is far more urbanized and on the move. People move from one location to another much more frequently than in years past, due to job changes, economic issues, and other factors. For these reasons, when a pet dies, burial may not always be practical. For many pet parents, cremation may be the only available option. Cremation as the choice for end of life arrangements continues to be on the rise for both humans and pets.

Is pet cremation increasing in popularity?

Yes. Cremation as an option to ground burial is becoming more common for both humans and pets.

Why would someone bury their pet in a pet cemetery rather than at home?

Local ordinances may prevent burial of animals on private property. In some cases, the owner may not be physically able to dig a grave on their property, or there may not be an appropriate spot on the property to accommodate a grave.

Do most veterinarians have their own crematory?

No. The vast majority of veterinarians do not have an on-site crematory. They may have an active partnership with a cremation service provider who may be either local or non-local. They may also be able to direct you to other pet cremation resources.

What is group cremation?

Group pet cremation is also known as “community” or “communal” cremation. In group cremation, the bodies of several animals are placed in the cremation chamber and cremated at the same time. The ashes of all the pets are mingled during the process. Ashes are not returned to the owner if this method is chosen.

When discussing pet cremation with a cremation provider, it is very important to ask the provider for clarification on exactly what they mean by the following terms: private cremation, individual cremation, partitioned pet cremation, and communal (or community) pet cremation.

In the pet cremation industry, there are currently no absolutely standardized definitions of these terms, so it is important to be sure you understand what the pet cremation provider means when they use these definitions.

What is the difference between private and communal (community) cremation?

The commonly accepted definition of private cremation states that the body of only one pet is placed into the cremation chamber and cremated, with the ashes then returned to the owner. In a communal (community) cremation, the bodies of several pets may be cremated together at the same time, and the ashes of all the pets are mingled in the process. No ashes are returned to the owner following a communal cremation.

However, in the pet cremation industry, there are no absolutely standardized definitions of these terms, so it is important to be sure you understand what the pet cremation provider means when they use these definitions.

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